PHOTO ALERT: Iffland Goes Home to Dive into Crocodile-Infested Waters

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Rhiannan Iffland
Rhiannan Iffland has gone back to her roots by diving from heady heights into crocodile-infested waters in her native Australia. The three-time Red Bull Cliff Diving champion launched herself off some previously undived spots in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu and Nitmiluk National Parks. Iffland had to get the blessing of the Jawoyn tribe in order to tackle the dives in question, ranging in height from 16.4 to 24 metres, a higher plunge than anything she has ever attempted during an already illustrious high-diving career. // Rhiannan Iffland gets blessed during the production of the Rainbow Dive project in Katherine Gorge, Australia on June 13, 2018 // Andy Green/Red Bull Content Pool // For more content, pictures and videos like this please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com
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Red Bull Cliff diving champion tackles mother nature in her native Australia

Rhiannan Iffland has gone back to her roots by diving from heady heights into crocodile-infested waters in her native Australia.

 

Rhiannan Iffland
Rhiannan Iffland has gone back to her roots by diving from heady heights into crocodile-infested waters in her native Australia. The three-time Red Bull Cliff Diving champion launched herself off some previously undived spots in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu and Nitmiluk National Parks. Iffland had to get the blessing of the Jawoyn tribe in order to tackle the dives in question, ranging in height from 16.4 to 24 metres, a higher plunge than anything she has ever attempted during an already illustrious high-diving career. // Rhiannan Iffland seen during the production of the Rainbow Dive in Katherine Gorge, Australia on June 15, 2018 // Andy Green/Red Bull Content Pool // For more content, pictures and videos like this please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com

 

The three-time Red Bull Cliff Diving champion packed up with childhood friend Emily to launch herself off some previously undived spots in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu and Nitmiluk National Parks. Here is all you need to know:

– The lifelong pals packed up a four-wheel drive, tackled more than 1,000 kilometres, helicoptered to scope the dives from the skies above as well as from kayaks on the water itself before Iffland carried out 15 dives in all.

 

Rhiannan Iffland
Rhiannan Iffland has gone back to her roots by diving from heady heights into crocodile-infested waters in her native Australia. The three-time Red Bull Cliff Diving champion launched herself off some previously undived spots in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu and Nitmiluk National Parks. Iffland had to get the blessing of the Jawoyn tribe in order to tackle the dives in question, ranging in height from 16.4 to 24 metres, a higher plunge than anything she has ever attempted during an already illustrious high-diving career. // Rhiannan Iffland’s seen in the water during the production of the Rainbow Dive project in Katherine Gorge, Australia on June 16, 2018 // Andy Green/Red Bull Content Pool // For more content, pictures and videos like this please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com

 

– The duo encountered pythons, numerous monstrous crocodiles as well as kangaroos.

– Iffland had to get the blessing of the Jawoyn tribe in order to tackle the dives in question, ranging in height from 16.4 to 24 metres, a higher plunge than anything she has ever attempted during an already illustrious high-diving career.

 

 

– It was not without its difficulties as she climbed 24m above the water’s surface. She said: “The highest I’ve ever dived is 23m. I know I can go higher, I want to go higher and I want to do it here.” Although before what proved a successful leap, she added: “I’m pretty nervous to tell you the truth.”

– Of the quest, Iffland explained: “I’ve spent my entire life diving: training, travelling, competing. But for everything it’s taken me away from the things I love… and I’ve always wanted to find and dive the most epic spot at home.”

 

Rhiannan Iffland
Rhiannan Iffland has gone back to her roots by diving from heady heights into crocodile-infested waters in her native Australia. The three-time Red Bull Cliff Diving champion launched herself off some previously undived spots in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu and Nitmiluk National Parks. Iffland had to get the blessing of the Jawoyn tribe in order to tackle the dives in question, ranging in height from 16.4 to 24 metres, a higher plunge than anything she has ever attempted during an already illustrious high-diving career. // Rhiannan Iffland’s performs during the production of the Rainbow Dive project in Katherine Gorge, Australia on June 12, 2018 // Andy Green/Red Bull Content Pool // For more content, pictures and videos like this please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com

 

– The aborigine locals performed a dance and musical performance before she became what is believed the first to take off from Jedda’s Leap, her first big dive of the documentary.

– Of the adventure, she said: “I can’t believe how beautiful it is here and how lucky I am to dive in a place like this in my own country. Diving has never felt better.”

 

Rhiannan Iffland
Rhiannan Iffland has gone back to her roots by diving from heady heights into crocodile-infested waters in her native Australia. The three-time Red Bull Cliff Diving champion launched herself off some previously undived spots in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu and Nitmiluk National Parks. Iffland had to get the blessing of the Jawoyn tribe in order to tackle the dives in question, ranging in height from 16.4 to 24 metres, a higher plunge than anything she has ever attempted during an already illustrious high-diving career. // Rhiannan Iffland dives during the production of the Rainbow Dive project in Katherine Gorge, Australia on June 13, 2018 // Andy Green/Red Bull Content Pool // For more content, pictures and videos like this please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com

 

– Aside from crocodiles in the water below, there was the danger of hitting the bottom of the river with each dive. A full team of safety experts helped her ensure it was safe to dive. But as she put it: “There’s no roads, no phone reception there’s no boats to carry us out if it goes wrong. It’s scary but in a way exciting at the same time.”

– The road trip is documented in a 30-minute film called Rainbow Dive.