OMG! Mormons Declare Porn a Health Hazard (Video)

Mormons Anti-Porn resolution claims that porn is a public health crisis

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OMG! Mormons Declare Porn a Health Hazard
OMG! Mormons Declare Porn a Health Hazard
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The first US State to declare porn to be a public health hazard just happens to be the global Mormons capital in Utah.

 

Resident Sexpert for Vogue magazine and Vice, Karley Sciortino, traveled to Utah to explore the idealism and reasoning behind the Mormons motivation to create a resolution declaring porn to be a public health crisis. She spoke with, not only the spokesman Senator on the issue, and members of the Coalition Against Pornography (UCAP), but also a renegade ex-Mormon pornographic film maker.

Sciortino resides on the side of the fence that is militantly pro-porn – except of course for her belief that children should not have access to it. She admits upfront that her obsession with sex and pornography likely resulted from her religious upbringing.

 

Porn as a reaction to religious repression

To open the short documentary on Vice, she interviews an anonymous ex-Mormon porn film maker and expresses those precise sentiments. “Religions makes people more slutty,” she remarked to the lesbian sex film maker, who chose to go by the name of “Brooke.” Brooke runs a Mormon themed porn website called mormongirlz.com.

Inspired by her experiences growing up within the LDS Church, Brooke decided to incorporate her love of pornography with making a mockery of the religious practices she was involved in at the temple. Mormons over a certain age wear long white undergarments and a green apron. Mormons shroud the meaning of these garments in secrecy. Brooke asks her porn stars to wear them while re-enacting hyper sexualized scenes that were similar to her own.

 

VIDEO (vice.com):

 

Sciortino decided to have a dabble in making some of the porn herself. Only afterwards did she set out to try to learn the other side of the story. The State of Utah has made some fairly hefty claims about the dangers of pornography, with which Sciortino says she is in disagreement. Indeed, the American Psychological Association concludes that the research is not convincing enough to declare porn to be an official addiction. Some psychiatric researchers instead surmise that it could potentially be a compulsion. Nevertheless, the jury is out.

 

Puritanical motivations?

Sciortino appears to immediately assume that Utah’s aversion to pornography is puritanical. She assumes that the predominantly Mormon community base it only on their religious belief. While interviewing people on the street, she realized it was predominantly Mormons who were in favor of the resolution. Those who found it absurd appeared not to be. She then interviewed the lawyer and Senator Todd Weil to find out why exactly the state of Utah wished to repress pornography.

After she learned more about Weil’s perspective, Sciortino admits she could see through her erroneous assumption that it was religious fervor that was the primary force behind the resolution. However, she did confront Weil with how the porn ban could be a way to shame and control people. Weil responds by claiming that the real primary force is getting porn out of reach from kids, and beginning to work on their self-esteem, self-respect, and self-image.

Weil likens the supposed porn health crisis issue to the health hazards derived from drugs and suicide. He reiterates that the resolution is not actual law. Weil hopes that it will evoke a discussion that will make people think about their choices. Additionally, he confirmed that Utah does not wish to ban pornography for adults.

 

OMG! Mormons Declare Porn a Health Hazard

 

 

Depression, shame, anxiety, dishonesty, and isolation

Sciortino then decides to investigate the more militant members of the community that are insisting on creating a war on porn. To do this, she attends a UCAP conference. The UCAP believe that porn is addictive. Additionally, they warn that porn “propagates racial stereotypes,” “is violent and misogynistic,” “leads to marital breakdown,” and is readily available to young people. Other allegations members of UCAP made against porn is that it leads to being incapable of living in reality. They claim it causes depression, shame, anxiety, dishonesty, and isolation. Also, Sciortino notices that most of the conference attendees were Mormons.

One of the strongest claims against pornography is that it is a slippery slope into illegal types of porn. Sciortino concludes her thoughts about her explorations in Utah by stating that she feels the whole resolution is based on religious repression. In fact, she almost admits that she wouldn’t be the sex obsessed person she is today if she had not experienced a sexually repressive religion in her childhood. It appears like she is incapable of seeing through that bitterness over religion. This bitterness prevents her from really analyzing what could be wrong with pornography.

What Sciortino fails to explore are the biological processes that occur during masturbation and watching porn. Biological and hormonal processes that can lead an addictive personality to develop an obsession with adult movies. During an orgasm, the brain lights up on an MRI screen as though it has had a hit of heroin. Immediately afterward, the dopamine in the blood stream drops. For many people, especially in a loving relationship, post-coital closeness can create an oxytocin flow that prevents a dopamine low.

 

 

 

Post-coital tristesse

However, for some people, this dopamine low can do one of two things. This dopamine low can make some individuals experience melancholy, which sometimes becomes chronic. This chronic melcancholy is called post-coital tristesse. It can last from a few minutes to up to a few hours. In fact, even the ancient Greeks wrote about it in 150AD. The other thing a drop in dopamine can do is make a person seek greater pleasures in order to replace that dopamine. Indeed, this is the precursor to addiction.

Alexander Rhodes began an online community called NoFap when he sought to overcome his own addiction to porn. Rhodes does not feel motivated by religion or puritanical beliefs. He has other reasons to abstain from masturbation and pornography. Instead, he claims, his porn addiction was starting to ruin his life. Rhodes cites research that shows how not only can porn become addictive. He claims other research reveals how numerous adolescents are complaining of sexual dysfunctions. These teens are experiencing types of sexual dysfunctions that men do not experience until they are past middle age.

 

Throwing the baby out with the bath water

Ultimately, Sciortino’s investigations into the state of Utah’s motivations to declare porn a health crisis was quite shallow. Writing off the resolution due to the primary adherents being religious seems like throwing the baby out with the bath water.

Indeed, many puritanical religions use sexual repression to control followers, and this has devastating psychological and emotional repercussions. Often it evolves into sexual abuse and other crimes. Nevertheless, it is important that the public examine the discussion about the health problems associated with excess porn. It is a shame that people should get lost in the emotions that surround their anti-religious sentiment.

 

References: American Psychological AssociatioVice, NoFap

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