No Remarkable Evidence that Antibiotic Use Equals Drug Resistance

Links are vague between effects and resistance to antibiotics use

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No Remarkable Evidence that Antibiotic Use Equals Drug Resistance
No Remarkable Evidence that Antibiotic Use Equals Drug Resistance
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Resistance to antibiotics is unclear

No clinical evidence supports the rule we all know so well. Complete the full dose of your medication otherwise; it won’t work. In clinical trial studies, it has been impossible to gather data and prove resistance of drugs against bacterial infections because of medical ethics.

In the case of antibiotics, researchers deemed giving placebos to a control group would cause symptoms of a bacterial infection to progress and hurt participants. Therefore, no placebos were given, creating an indeterminable case for effective results of antibiotics against bacterial infections.

 

No Remarkable Evidence that Antibiotic Use Equals Drug Resistance
No Remarkable Evidence that Antibiotic Use Equals Drug Resistance

 

The only way to truly test the resistance of drugs and patient improvement is by testing and monitoring the infection and level of bacteria throughout the entire course of the treatment.

This is never carried out by any doctors or medical personnel. Therefore, the old paradigm “finish the course of antibiotic therapy” is based only on the assumption. It has no basis in fact or proven theory.

Even though antibiotics should be taken according to their prescription, it’s unclear that a specific treatment duration is accurate or superlative. Some of the deficiencies from antibiotic use are a risk of resistance, diabetes, inflammatory diseases and obesity.  It’s good to know that there are doctors out there who are working to formulate algorithms that will reduce exposure to antibiotic effects.

 

Pink eye is a perfectly illustrative example of how antibiotic treatments are not necessary.

However, keep in mind there are various types of pink eye. A virus similar to influenza causes one type of pink eye. It is contagious and will appear then clear up within days without any interference or medical treatment.

 

This type of eye infection is often caused the same way as the common cold. Exposure to germs where many dirty hands, coughing, and sneezing might be present.

For instance, a kindergarten, classroom, home or playground where germs pass by the lack of cleanliness and conscious washing of hands. It’s a good idea to wipe down with cleansers door handles; water faucet handles, sinks, cabinets, and any other place often touched by the human hand.

 

 

No Remarkable Evidence that Antibiotic Use Equals Drug Resistance
No Remarkable Evidence that Antibiotic Use Equals Drug Resistance

 

Most often viral conjunctivitis reveals itself with watery, and itchy eyes.

Reminders to wash with soap and cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze will nurture a more cleanly environment.  Sensitivity to light can also be present.

Another type of pink eye is an allergic reactions. This could be from irritants such as dust, animal hair, pollen and sometimes, even reaction to food allergies or hives. Watery, burning, itching eyes often accompany runny and stuffy nose. In this case, both eyes usually act up. Don’t worry, this type of eye infection is not contagious.

Lastly, you have the dreaded bacterial pink eye. This infection potentially causes serious damage to the eye. In this case, bacterial eye drops or ointments are necessary. This conjunctivitis will produce sticky yellow or greenish discharge from the corner of the eye.

 

Sometimes eyelids will stick together especially in the morning when you wake up.

In any case, whether eye infection or cold symptoms, it is essential to contact your doctor to determine the course of treatment that will address the symptoms you have. There is nothing worse than being treated for an illness you don’t have.

The damage medications can cause is too risky to overlook or play games. Your health is your happiness. Guard and protect your health.

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