Major Archaeological Discoveries of 2016

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Major Archaeological Discoveries of 2016
Major Archaeological Discoveries of 2016
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Throughout the last year, archaeologists revealed many amazing archaeological discoveries.

Every year that we move forward in time, archaeologists continue to peel back many layers of years into the past. Consequently, they discover archaeological treasures and history that tells us a clearer story of who we all once were.

 

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016

 

Indeed, 2016 revealed many interesting finds such as a dinosaur tail preserved in amber and ancient roman shoes. Consequently, we have listed these, and more intriguing finds, below.

 

Ancient Oven

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Ancient Oven
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Ancient Oven

An archaeologist by the name of Bob Dawe discovered an oven from around 400 A.D. that still contained food. Surprisingly, it had been left untouched in a place known now as “Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump”.

The oven is about the size of a table, and he had it lifted in its entirety to the Royal Alberta Museum. There, he will analyze it to find out exactly what food was being cooked inside.

 

Bronze Age Stilt Houses

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Bronze Age Stilt Houses
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Bronze Age Stilt Houses

In the East Anglian Fens, archaeologists have uncovered an insight into what domesticity looked like at the end of the Bronze Age, 3000 years ago. They discovered a settlement that would have housed a group of families, built above water on stilts.

At some point, it appears as though fire caused the inhabitants to move on. However, what they left behind became preserved in the river.

 

Viking Settlement

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Viking Settlement
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Viking Settlement

Archaeologists like Sarah Parcak are now utilizing satellites to locate archaeological sites. As a result, her recent find in North America may put to rest the theory that Viking visits across the Atlantic Ocean have till now been nothing more than a myth.

Although she doesn’t yet have definitive proof, the clues that include a telltale turf wall, which is unique to Viking culture, seem to point to a legitimate testimony that they did indeed visit America.

 

 

Ancient Shipwreck Cargo

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Ancient Shipwreck Cargo
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Ancient Shipwreck Cargo

Impressive artifacts from the bronze age have been recovered from Caesarea National Park’s ancient harbor. Wonderfully preserved, archaeologists found bronze figurines of gods and goddesses, lamps, statues and animals. Ultimately, it has been the largest find of its kind in 30 years.

 

2000-Year-Old Butter

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - 2000-Year-Old Butter
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – 2000-Year-Old Butter

A turf cutter in County Meath in Ireland discovered a 2000-year-old “Bog Butter”. And apparently, it is still edible! Before modern refrigeration, for the greater part of the history of humanity, people had to find alternative ways to preserve food.

Bogs provided a low oxygen and cold environment that was perfect for this.

 

17th Century Map

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - 17th Century Map

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – 17th Century Map

Tenants found a large, ancient and intricate map rolled up in a chimney. No doubt it would have been an expensive prized possession for its original owner. Presumably, it was probably put in the chimney by a later inheritor of the map who didn’t understand it’s worth

The modern owners found the map during a house renovation. Consequently, conservators are now restoring it tirelessly at the National Library of Scotland. It contains faces, towns, cities and ships all beautifully designed.

 

Viking Church and Altar

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Viking Church and Altar

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Viking Church and Altar

Norwegian archaeologists uncovered a promising site near Trondheim. The site looks to have been the church that enshrined Olaf Haraldsson, Viking King, as a saint.

Undoubtedly, this adds weight to the Norse legends that allegedly took place during that era.

 

Cave Paintings

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Cave Paintings
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Cave Paintings

In the Atxurra cave in Spain’s Basque country, cavers discovered a series of cave paintings dating as far back as about 14,500 years. These paintings depict deer, horses, goats and bison.

Diego Garage, an archaeologist, and Inaki Intxaurbe a Caver discovered the images. Consequently, experts claim that they are the most significant archaeological find in that region.

 

Neanderthal Stone Circles

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Neanderthal Stone Circles
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Neanderthal Stone Circles

Archaeologists uncovered what looks likely to be the earliest of all man-made structures. Subsequently, they have been dated at being around 176,500 years old. This now gives a vital insight into the very first evidence of human cave occupation.

Archaeologists found these in the Tarn et Garonne region, inside the Bruniquel Cave in France.

 

Roman Shoes

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Roman Shoes
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Roman Shoes

In a series of ditches at an 1800-year-old fort site called Vindolanda, archaeologists uncovered 421 Roman shoes. They also discovered pieces of leather, pottery, and animal skeletons. Presumably, the Romans dumped them as rubbish when the war ended.

Furthermore, the ditch environment lacked oxygen when the Romans built a new town on top of the original site. Consequently, this enabled the pristine preservation of these shoes.

 

Dinosaur Tail

Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 - Dinosaur Tail
Greatest Archaeological discoveries 2016 – Dinosaur Tail

Finally, a discovery of a piece of amber containing a thin section of dinosaur tail covered in feathers. A lecturer from the China University of Geosciences, Dr. Lida Xing, discovered the treasure. Ultimately, its existence came to light when Dr. Lida uncovered it in an amber market in Myitkyina, not far from China.

After analysis, paleontologists estimate that it is likely to be 99 million years old.