3,400 Year-Old Ancient Melody Reveals Source Of Music

Ancient hymn six displays music melody discovered | Image credit: ketrin1407 via flickr.com

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3,400 Year-Old Ancient Melody Reveals Source Of Music
3,400 Year-Old Ancient Melody Reveals Source Of Music
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Melody and music are so much more than sound

Although it touches each one of us differently and can communicate feelings, messages and inspire emotions. Music can calm the savage beast inside every one of us. Its source is intangible and in truth unknown.

 

 

Within the wellspring of creative energy, we all have access to and embody music which somehow makes its way into the world. However, only the written notes are tangible. Words can’t even communicate the same thoughts as music.

 

We often think of music as a modern creation, but it is certainly not

The ancient hymn known as hymn six was discovered from ruins in Ugarit. As many as 29 scrolls of music were found along with this one. The melody is straightforward but heartfelt.

 

YOUTUBE (AssyriaTimes):

 

This discovery is evidence of the fact that ancient harmonies existed before ancient Greece. Undoubtedly, a simply strummed lyre was the most common musical instrument of antiquity.

Comparatively, the now trancelike music we hear is not music at all. Rather, it is a synthesized computed method of synchronized beats. It inspires no stirrings from the soul. This should be a sign that the music has no heart.

 

 

Music and DNA

In fact, many say musical notes correlate to DNA. Just as score and musical sequencing can translate to an orchestra and its instruments, every note has unique identifiers that amplify and affect amino acids within our bodies.

In other words, each of us has our own background music with which we move and function rhythmically in the world.

It is a comfort to know that music encompasses our lives so beautifully. Since all things flow from the soul, music makes life so much more exciting and meaningful.

References: Token Rock, Ancient History Encyclopedia
Image credit: ketrin1407 via flickr.com